What type of doctor should you see for a suspicious mole?

If you have a mole that concerns you, your family doctor can usually let you know if it’s normal or needs further investigation. He or she may then refer you to a doctor who specializes in skin disorders (dermatologist) for diagnosis and treatment. It’s a good idea to arrive for your appointment well-prepared.

Can a doctor tell if a mole is cancerous just by looking at it?

Unfortunately, you can’t tell by looking at a mole whether it’s cancerous or what type it is. It could very well be a normal skin spot with an abnormal appearance. A dermatologist can’t always tell the difference either.

What happens if a mole looks suspicious?

The more abnormal features moles have, the riskier they are. Frequent monitoring of these moles is especially crucial, so that if a melanoma arises, it can be detected and treated as early as possible. If your doctor identifies a mole as suspicious, or if new moles appear after age 40, you may need a biopsy.

Can primary care doctors look at moles?

Primary-care physicians include family practice, pediatrics, and internal medicine. If your physician feels that a mole needs to be removed, he or she may either perform the procedure himself or herself or refer you to a skin specialist (dermatologist).

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What does Stage 1 melanoma look like?

Stage I melanoma is no more than 1.0 millimeter thick (about the size of a sharpened pencil point), with or without an ulceration (broken skin). There is no evidence that Stage I melanoma has spread to the lymph tissues, lymph nodes, or body organs.

What does a cancerous mole feel like?

Also, when melanoma develops in an existing mole, the texture of the mole may change and become hard or lumpy. The skin lesion may feel different and may itch, ooze, or bleed, but a melanoma skin lesion usually does not cause pain.

How likely is it for a mole to be cancerous?

The risk of an atypical mole becoming cancerous is about 1%, compared to . 03% for an ordinary mole. In addition to atypical moles, risk factors for developing melanoma include: Red or blond hair.

What percentage of biopsied moles are cancerous?

Lab testing showed that more than 90 percent of biopsied moles were completely removed by using the single procedure, with 11 (7 percent) diagnosed as melanoma, one of the most aggressive forms of skin cancer.

Should I get my mole biopsied?

Although skin cancers can form in moles and spots you have had most of your life, biopsies should also be done for new, changing, or painful spots that do not resolve quickly. Besides cancers, if you have a rash that is not responsive to treatment, a skin biopsy is a good idea to help further evaluate the diagnosis.

How does a dermatologist check for melanoma?

Skin cancer diagnosis always requires a skin biopsy

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The procedure that your dermatologist uses to remove the spot is called a skin biopsy. Having a skin biopsy is essential. It’s the only way to know whether you have skin cancer. There’s no other way to know for sure.

Should I worry about a mole biopsy?

When you notice a concerning rash or mole on your skin, the body’s largest organ, it’s a good idea to see a dermatologist to have it evaluated. Sometimes after checking the area, your dermatologist may recommend a skin biopsy. Skin biopsies are an important part of verifying a diagnosis.

How do I know if my mole is bad?

It’s important to get a new or existing mole checked out if it:

  1. changes shape or looks uneven.
  2. changes colour, gets darker or has more than 2 colours.
  3. starts itching, crusting, flaking or bleeding.
  4. gets larger or more raised from the skin.

How do you know if you caught melanoma early?

Any change in size, shape, color or elevation of a spot on your skin, or any new symptom in it, such as bleeding, itching or crusting, may be a warning sign of melanoma.

Is melanoma a death sentence?

Metastatic melanoma was once almost a death sentence, with a median survival of less than a year. Now, some patients are living for years, with a few out at more than 10 years. Clinicians are now talking about a ‘functional cure’ in the patients who respond to therapy.