Is skin cancer treated by a dermatologist or an oncologist?

Most basal and squamous cell cancers (as well as pre-cancers) are treated by dermatologists – doctors who specialize in treating skin diseases. If the cancer is more advanced, you may be treated by another type of doctor, such as: A surgical oncologist: a doctor who treats cancer with surgery.

Do oncologists deal with skin cancer?

A medical oncologist is a doctor who treats cancer. You may need to see an oncologist if you have an advanced or high-risk type of skin cancer. There are different subtypes of oncologists, including: Dermatological oncologist This is an oncologist who specializes in diagnosing and treating skin cancer.

Do I need to see an oncologist for melanoma?

If the melanoma has spread beyond the skin, you’re likely to see a team of medical specialists. An oncologist may determine the stage of your melanoma.

Can a dermatologist spot skin cancer?

If you find a suspicious spot, seeing a dermatologist can give you peace of mind. Dermatologists are experts in caring for the skin and have more experience diagnosing skin cancer than any other doctor. You can find a dermatologist by going to, Find a dermatologist.

What’s the difference between basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma?

Though this form of skin cancer is not usually life-threatening, one major difference between basal cell and squamous cell cancers is that squamous cell cancer are more likely to grow deeper into the layers of your skin and spread to other parts of the body.

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What is the best treatment for squamous cell carcinoma in situ?

The simplest and most common treatment for smaller SCC in situ is surgical excision. The standard practice is to remove about a quarter inch beyond the edge of the cancer. Larger ones can also be excised, but Mohs surgery may be needed. It offers the highest cure rate of all treatment methods.

What does Stage 1 melanoma look like?

Stage I melanoma is no more than 1.0 millimeter thick (about the size of a sharpened pencil point), with or without an ulceration (broken skin). There is no evidence that Stage I melanoma has spread to the lymph tissues, lymph nodes, or body organs.

Does melanoma show up in blood work?

Blood tests. Blood tests aren’t used to diagnose melanoma, but some tests may be done before or during treatment, especially for more advanced melanomas. Doctors often test blood for levels of a substance called lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) before treatment.

What are the symptoms of melanoma that has spread?

If your melanoma has spread to other areas, you may have:

  • Hardened lumps under your skin.
  • Swollen or painful lymph nodes.
  • Trouble breathing, or a cough that doesn’t go away.
  • Swelling of your liver (under your lower right ribs) or loss of appetite.
  • Bone pain or, less often, broken bones.